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Barack Obama shares beautiful message to daughters Sasha and Malia: 'I'm most proud to be your dad'

The former US President shared an old throwback picture of his girls

by Sharnaz Shahid

Barack Obama took to his Twitter page on Sunday to share a heartfelt Father's Day message to his two daughters, Sasha and Malia. He wrote: "Of all that I've done in my life, I'm most proud to be Sasha and Malia's dad. To all those lucky enough to be a dad, Happy Father's Day!" Earlier on in the day, former First Lady Michelle Obama shared a sweet tribute to her spouse. "Happy #FathersDay @BarackObama. Our daughters may be older and taller now, but they’ll always be your little girls. We love you," she said.

 

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The touching tribute comes after Twittersphere went into meltdown after discovering Sasha's real name is actually Natasha. The youngest Obama, who turned 16 last week, was inundated with well-wishers but it was one journalist's tweet which caught the world's attention. Refinery29 writer Ashley C. Ford wrote: "Today is the one year anniversary of me finding out Sasha Obama's actual first name is Natasha."

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Barack, the 44th President of the United States, has always been open about the close bond he shares with his children. Earlier this year, he was full of praise for Malia, 18, and Sasha, 16, when asked how they handled the election results in November. "Man, my daughters are something," he said during his final White House press conference. "They just surprise and enchant and impress me more and more each day as they grow up. So these days when we talk, we talk as parent to child, but also we learn from them, and I think it was really interesting to see how Malia and Sasha reacted."

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Barack, who noted that neither one of his girls want a future in politics, explained that he has no doubt that they will continue to be positive role models moving forward. "Part through osmosis and part through dinner time conversations, they understand that this is a big complicated country and that democracy is messy and that it doesn't always work the exact way that you may want it," he confessed. "It doesn't guarantee certain outcomes, but if you're engaged and you're involved and see there are a lot more good people than bad in this country and that there is a core decency in this country, and that they have to be a part of lifting that up, and I expect they will be."