rod stewart

Rod Stewart reveals secret three-year battle with prostate cancer

The 74-year-old musician is now in remission

Sharnaz Shahid

Sir Rod Stewart has revealed he has secretly been battling prostate cancer for three years. The 74-year-old singer, who was diagnosed in February 2016 during a routine check-up, has urged men to have their prostates checked after explaining he beat his fight with cancer because it was caught early. Speaking to an audience at a fundraising event for the Prostate Project in Surrey with his former Faces bandmates Kenney Jones and Ronnie Wood, the musician shared: "No one knows this, but I thought this was about time I told everybody. I'm in the clear, now, simply because I caught it early. I have so many tests."

rod-stewart-singing

Rod Stewart has shared his cancer battle with fans

Rod, who has been in remission since July, confessed he managed to get through his treatment by keeping positive and smiling. "If you're positive, and you work through it and you keep a smile on your face," he added, reported The Mirror. "I've worked for two years and I've just been happy, and the good Lord looked after me."

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The singer and other artists joined forces to share their cancer stories in a bid to encourage men to detect the disease as part of the The Men, We Are With You campaign by Prostate Cancer UK. Last year, Stephen Fry revealed he had had his prostate removed after being diagnosed with cancer. He was diagnosed with the disease at the end of 2017, and had his prostate removed in February 2018.

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At the time, Stephen posted a video explaining his treatment on his website. He said: "For the last two months I've been in the throes of a rather unwelcome and unexpected adventure. I'm sorry I haven't felt able to talk about it till now, but here I am explaining what has been going on." He added: "Cancer is a word that rings in your head. 'I've got cancer' I kept saying to myself, good heavens. You're not supposed to get cancer. I know it's a cliché but you don't think it's going to happen to you, cancer is something that happens to other people."

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